Jan
05
Google Earth Hero: Chief Almir and the Surui tribe of Amazon


>>If the ocean’s not healthy, we’re not healthy.>>… One of the greatest threats to elephants
today.>>They’ll be able to take photographs, videos
that are GPS-located, immediately upload to Google Earth, and use this as a way to protect
the forest. [ pause ] [ Chief Almir speaking local language ]>>MOORE: Chief Almir had seen Google Earth
in an Internet café in 2007 and he asked for our help.
His idea was if we could teach the young people how to use YouTube, how to interview the elders,
record this content, attach it to Google Earth, it would be a way of sharing their culture
with the world. [ chanting in local language ]>>MOORE: When we came down this year, we
trained the Surui people in how to use a new technology using cell phones.
So, when illegal loggers penetrate their land, they’ll be able to take photographs, videos
that are GPS-located, immediately upload to Google Earth, alert the law enforcement authorities,
and use this as a way to protect the forest. So, whoever’s responsible for enforcing the
law, they can’t deny that it happened anymore because half a billion people around the world
can see it with their own eyes. Tropical deforestation accounts for 20% of
the greenhouse gas emissions that we all produce. A few years back, many members of the tribe
organized to replant the forest that had been illegally logged.
Using cell phones, they can document what trees are there and where there’s the blank
areas, and document their plans for planting, so that they can gain access to the carbon
offset marketplace. [ Chief Almir speaking local language ]>>MOORE: Everyone can do something to stop
deforestation this year. Go to your country representative to the Copenhagen
Climate Change Treaty and get your government to support REDD. [ Chief Almir speaking local language ] [ man singing in local language ]